History of Warren County, Pennsylvania

While it may seem to the uninitiated a task involving but little difficulty to prepare for publication a work no more comprehensive in character than this volume and containing the history merely of a single county, still it is not out of place here to assure all such readers that the work is one demand- ing a vast amount of labor and research, watchful care, untiring patience, and great discrimination. This need not be said to any person who has had experience in similar work. In attempting the production of a creditable history of Warren County, the publishers and the editor did not underestimate the difficulties of their task, and came to it fully imbued with a clear idea of its magnitude, and a determination to execute it in such a manner that it should receive the commendation of all into whose hands it should fall. It is believed that this purpose has been substantially carried out, and that, while a perfect historical work has never yet been published, this one will be found to contain so few imperfections that the most critical reader will be satisfied.

It has been a part of the plans of the publishers in the production of this history to secure, as far as possible, assistance from parties resident in the county, either as writers, or in the revision of all manuscripts; the consequence being that the work bears a local character which could not otherwise be secured, and, moreover, comes from the press far more complete and perfect than could possibly be the case were it in-trusted wholly to the efforts of comparative strangers to the locality in hand. In carrying out this plan, the editor has been tendered such generous co-operation and assistance of various kinds, that to merely mention all who have thus aided is impossible; the satisfaction of having assisted in the production of a commendable public enterprise must be their present reward.

Those who have aided and encouraged in this work have been almost "legion"; and to all such the writer extends his grateful thanks, and hopes his efforts to present a truthful history will not prove fruitless, but that it may be a mile-stone of events reared upon our county's century course, and read by our youth and posterity with such profit that they, by their true patriotism, industry and frugality, may be enabled to add as worthy a record of their day and generation as the fathers of the county have here transcribed.

 

Table of Contents

CHAPTER I.
OUR SUBJECT SOMEWHAT EXPLAINED 13

CHAPTER II.
NATURAL FEATURES, ETC 15

CHAPTER III.
EUROPEAN DISCOVERIES, ETC., 1534-1655 21

CHAPTER IV.
THE IROQUOIS 28

CHAPTER V.
FROM 1655 TO l680 34

CHAPTER VI.
THE PROVINCE OF PENNSYLVANIA 38

CHAPTER VII.
PENN IN PENNSYLVANIA 49

CHAPTER VIII.
FRENCH DOMINION 56

CHAPTER IX.
ENGLISH DOMINION 72

CHAPTER X.
FROM 1783 TO 1790 83

CHAPTER XI.
CORNPLANTER AND OTHER INDIANS 1790-91 96

CHAPTER XII.
FROM 1791 TO 1800 110

CHAPTER XIII.
THE ERA OF FORMATION, EARLY SETTLEMENTS, ETC., FROM 1800 TO 1819 125

CHAPTER XIV.
FROM THE ORGANIZATION OF THE COUNTY UNTIL 1830 141

CHAPTER XV.
FROM 1830 TO 1861 149

CHAPTER XVI.
DURING AND SINCE THE LATE WAR 161

CHAPTER XVII.
THIRTY-NINTH REGIMENT TENTH RESERVE 169

CHAPTER XVIII.
FORTY-SECOND REGiMENT BUCKTAIL RIFLES 179

CHAPTER XIX.
FIFTY-EIGHTH AND EIGHTY-THIRD REGIMENTS 192

CHAPTER XX.
ONE HUNDRED AND ELEVENTH REGIMENT 196

CHAPTER XXI.
ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTEENTH AND ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-FIFTH REGIMENTS 214

CHAPTER XXII.
ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY-FIRST AND ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY-NINTH REGIMENTS 227

CHAPTER XXIII.
ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTY-SECOND REGIMENT AND OTHER COMMANDS 238

CHAPTER XXIV.
COUNTY BUILDINGS, ETC 253

CHAPTER XXV.
TOWNSHIP ORGANIZATIONS 259

CHAPTER XXVI.
AGRICULTURAL SOCIETIES 269

CHAPTER XXVII.
THE PRESS 276

CHAPTER XXVIII.
PETROLEUM 285

CHAPTER XXIX.
CIVIL LIST 294

CHAPTER XXX.
RIVER NAVIGATION, ETC., WAGON ROADS, RAILROADS 302

CHAPTER XXXI.
THE BENCH AND BAR 311

CHAPTER XXXII.
HISTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF WARREN 324

CHAPTER XXXIII.
HISTORY OF CONEWANGO TOWNSHIP 394

CHAPTER XXXIV.
HISTORY OF BROKENSTHAW TOWNSHIP 401

CHAPTER XXXV.
HISTORY OF SUGAR GROVE TOWNSHIP 420

CHAPTER XXXVI.
HISTORY OF PINE GROVE TOWNSHIP 443

CHAPTER XXXVII.
HISTORY OF DEERFIELD TOWNSHIP 453

CHAPTER XXXVIII.
HISTORY OF SPRING CREEL TOWNSHIP 467

CHAPTER XXIX.
HISTORY OF KINZUA TOWNSHIP 475

CHAPTER XL.
HISTORY OF COLUMBUS TOWNSHIP 483

CHAPTER XLI.
HISTORY OF LIMESTONE TOWNSHIP 493

CHAPTER XLII.
HISTORY OF ELK TOWNSHIP 498

CHAPTER XLIII.
HISTORY OF SHEFFIELD TOWNSHIP 511

CHAPTER XLIV.
HISTORY OF FREEHOLD TOWNSHIP 523

CHAPTER XLV.
HISTORY OF PLEASANT TOWNSHIP 532

CHAPTER XLVI.
HISTORY OF SOUTHWEST TOWNSHIP 537

CHAPTER XLVII.
HISTORY OF ELDRED TOWNSHIP 545

CHAPTER XLVII.
HISTORY OF GLADE TOWNSHIP 550

CHAPTER XLIX.
HISTORY OF CORYDON TOWNSHIP 559

CHAPTER L.
HISTORY OF PITTSFIELD TOWNSHIP 566

CHAPTER LI.
HISTORY OF MEAD TOWNSHIP 576

CHAPTER LII.
HISTORY OF CHERRY GROVE TOWNSHIP 583

CHAPTER LIII.
HISTORY OF FARMINGTON TOWNSHIP 586

CHAPTER LIV.
HISTORY OF TRIUMPH TOWNSHIP 593

CHAPTER LV.
HISTORY OF WATSON TOWNSHIP 597

CHAPTER LVI.
BIOGRAPHICAL 599
BRIEF PERSONALS 691

 

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On that eventful mid-summer's day in 1749 when Captain Bienville de Celeron, "Knight of the Royal and Military Order of St. Louis," in command of two hundred and fifteen French soldiers and fifty-five Indians, appeared on the south bank of the Allegheny River, opposite the mouth of Conewango Creek, there buried an engraved leaden plate, and, with the display of much pomp and ceremony, formally assumed possession of this and adjoining regions vast in extent, in the name of the reigning king of France, a stand-point was reached; a beginning, as it were, was made in the real, wellauthenticated history of Warren county, Pennsylvania. But, in the endeavor to explain the long and interesting chain of events which led up to this occupation by the French, to describe the conflicting claims of the English and their various operations, civil as well as military, in the effort to obtain possession of the same territory, and to briefly outline the history of the primordial inhabitants of "these cantons," it is found necessary to go delving back in the past, two centuries or more before the advent of Celeron upon these shores, to gather up the threads of an historic narrative which, upon perusal, it is believed will not prove uninteresting to the reader.