History of Clarion County, Pennsylvania

Josephus says, "Those who undertake to write histories, do not, I perceive, take that trouble on one and the same account; but for many and various reasons. For some apply themselves to this part of learning to show their great skill in composition; and that they may therein acquire a reputation. Others write histories in order to gratify those who happen to be concerned in them; But there are others who of necessity are driven to write history, because they are concerned in the facts, and so cannot excuse themselves from committing them to writing, for the advantage of posterity."

The editor of the following pages can not profess any of these motives, but in analyzing his own emotions he finds that he must have been impelled to this "labor of love" by a desire to wrest from oblivion the annals of a people unpretentious in their manners, simple in their habits, but strong in manly virtues.

Not many thrilling adventures are related in this narrative of the doings of the people of Clarion county, but here and there we are afforded glimpses of the sterling patriotism, the noble daring, and the lofty courage of those whom occasion afforded the opportunity to display these virtues.

The record of the settlement and development of Clarion county contains few startling incidents. Peaceful and quiet has been the history of this people, and while our fathers and brothers bear a record of loyal devotion to their country in at least two wars, no spot within the borders of our county can be pointed out with certainty as the scene of sanguinary battle. So may it be evermore.

Owing to many pressing duties the editor has been able to write but a small portion of this work, and he is indebted to George J. Reid, Esq., of Clarion, for the preparation of all of the county history, excepting the annals of the civil war, which were compiled and written by Hon. W. A. Beer, of Calensburg. Besides these gentlemen the following persons each wrote the local history of one or more townships or boroughs: C.E. Rugh, Benton Price, L.L. Himes, Miss Clara Campbell, S.C. Hepler, W.W. Deatrick, M.E. Hess, C.F. McNutt, David Bryner, John Beer, Miss Alice Allen, and John Graham.

 

Table of Contents

CHAPTER I.
PENNSYLVANIA FROM FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE REVOLUTION... 13

CHAPTER II.
FROM THE REVOLUTION TO THE PRESENT TIME... 27

CHAPTER III.
TOPOGRAPHY OF CLARION COUNTY... 38

CHAPTER IV.
GEOLOGY AND MINERALOGY... 42

CHAPTER V.
FROM THE EARLIEST PERIOD TO THE PURCHASE OF 1784... 57

CHAPTER VI.
FROM THE PURCHASE OF 1784 TO THE SETTLEMENT OF THE COUNTY... 63

CHAPTER VII.
FROM THE SETTLEMENT OF THE COUNTY TO THE WAR OF 1812... 76

CHAPTER VIII.
THE WAR OF 1812... 87

CHAPTER IX.
FROM THE WAR OF 1812 TO THE ERECTION OF THE COUNTY... 92

CHAPTER X.
FROM THE ERECTION OF THE COUNTY TO THE IRON ERA 1839-1845... 101

CHAPTER XI.
THE FURNACES... 112

CHAPTER XII.
FROM THE IRON ERA TO THE CIVIL WAR. 1845-1861... 121

CHAPTER XIII.
THE SOLDIERS OF CLARION COUNTY IN THE REBELLION... 142

CHAPTER XIV.
COMPANY H, THIRTY-SEVENTH REGIMENT EIGHTH RESERVE... 145

CHAPTER XV.
COMPANY E, THIRTY-NINTH REGIMENT TENTH RESERVE... 152

CHAPTER XVI.
COMPANIES OF THE FIFTY-SEVENTH REGIMENT MILITIA OF 1863... 164

CHAPTER XVII.
COMPANY C, SIXTY-SECOND REGIMENT, P.V... 167

CHAPTER XVIII.
COMPANY E, SIXTY-SECOND REGIMENT... 178

CHAPTER XIX.
COMPANY F, SIXTY-THIRD REGIMENT... 189

CHAPTER XX.
COMPANY F, SIXTY-SEVENTH REGIMENT, P. V... 209

CHAPTER XXI.
COMPANY C, SEVENTY-EIGHTH REGIMENT, P.V... 218

CHAPTER XXII.
COMPANY E, SEVENTY-EIGHTH REGIMENT, P.V... 225

CHAPTER XXIII.
COMPANY A, ONE HUNDRED AND THIRD REGIMENT, P.V... 232

CHAPTER XXIV.
COMPANY B, ONE HUNDRED AND THIRD REGIMENT, P.V... 243

CHAPTER XXV.
COMPANY F, ONE HUNDRED AND THIRD REGIMENT, P.V... 250

CHAPTER XXVI.
COMPANY B, ONE HUNDRED AND THIRD REGIMENT P.V... 257

CHAPTER XXVII.
COMPANY C, ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTH REGIMENT P.V... 264

CHAPTER XXVIII.
COMPANY L, ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTH REGIMENT, P.V. ELEVENTH CAVALRY... 277

CHAPTER XXIX.
COMPANY K, ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-EIGHTH REGIMENT, P.V... 289

CHAPTER XXX.
COMPANY H, ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-NINTH REGIMENT P.V... 299

CHAPTER XXXI.
COMPANY G, ONE HUNDRED AVND FIFTY-FIFTH REGIMENT P.V... 308

CHAPTER XXXII.
COMPANY H, ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY-FIFTH REGIMENT P.V... 318

CHAPTER XXXIII.
COMPANY K, ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY-NINTH REGIMENT P.V. FOURTEENTH CAVALRY... 327

CHAPTER XXXIV.
COMPANY B, ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTY-NINTH REGIMENT... 329

CHAPTER XXXV.
MISCELLANEOUS ENLISTMENTS... 334

CHAPTER XXXVI.
FROM THE CIVIL WAR TO THE OIL ERA 1865-1877... 343

CHAPTER XXXVII.
THE DEVELOPMENT OF PETROLEUM... 347

CHAPTER XXXVIII.
THE LUMBER AND COAL INDUSTRIES... 359

CHAPTER XXXIX.
FROM THE OIL ERA TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1877-1887... 367

CHAPTER XL.
THE BENCH AND BAR... 387

CHAPTER XLI.
SCHOOLS... 411

CHAPTER XLII.
CHURCHES... 420

CHAPTER XLIII.
HISTORY OF ASHLAND TOWNSHIP... 432

CHAPTER XLIV.
HISTORY OF BEAVER TOWNSHIP... 441

CHAPTER XLV.
HISTORY OF BRADY TOWNSHIP... 449

CHAPTER XLVI.
HISTORY OF EAST BRADY BOROUGH... 452

CHAPTER XLVII.
HISTORY OF CALLENSBURG BOROUGH... 459

CHAPTER XLVIII.
HISTORY OF CLARION TOWNSHIP... 467

CHAPTER XLIX.
HISTORY OF CLARION BOROUGH... 474

CHAPTER L.
HISTORY OF CURLLSVILLE BOROUGH... 496

CHAPTER LI.
HISTORY OF EDENBURG BOROUGH... 499

CHAPTER LII.
HISTORY OF ELK TOWNSHIP... 506

CHAPTER LIII.
HISTORY OF FARMINGTON TOWNSHIP... 513

CHAPTER LIV.
HISTORY OF HIGHLAND TOWNSHIP... 516

CHAPTER LV.
HISTORY OF KNOX TOWNSHIP... 519

CHAPTER LVI.
HISTORY OF LICKING TOWNSHIP... 524

CHAPTER LVII.
HISTORY OF LIMESTONE TOWNSHIP... 531

CHAPTER LVIII.
HISTORY OF MADISON TOWNSHIP... 536

CHAPTER LIX.
HISTORY OF MILL CREEK TOWNSHIP... 543

CHAPTER LX.
HISTORY OF MONROE TOWNSHIP... 546

CHAPTER LXI.
HISTORY OF NEW BETHLEHEM BOROUGH... 551

CHAPTER LXII.
HISTORY OF PAINT TOWNSHIP... 562

CHAPTER LXIII.
HISTORY OF PERRY TOWNSHIP... 565

CHAPTER LXIV.
HISTORY OF PINEY TOWNSHIP... 569

CHAPTER LXV.
HISTORY OF PORTER TOWNSHIP... 573

CHAPTER LXVI.
HISTORY OF REDBANK TOWNSHIP... 582

CHAPTER LXVII.
HISTORY OF RICHLAND TOWNSHIP... 588

CHAPTER LXVIII.
HISTORY OF RIMERSBURG BOROUGH... 592

CHAPTER LXIX.
HISTORY OF ST. PETERSBURG BOROUGH... 600

CHAPTER LXX.
HISTORY OF SALEM TOWNSHIP... 606

CHAPTER LXXI.
HISTORY OF SLIGO BOROUGH... 611

CHAPTER LXXII.
HISTORY OF STRATTANVILLE BOROUGH... 613

CHAPTER LXXIII.
HISTORY OF TOBY TOWNSHIP... 617

CHAPTER LXXIV.
HISTORY OF WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP... 622

CHAPTER LXXV.
BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES... 631
BRIEF PERSONALS... I
INDEX.. LXV

 

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Thomas Penn arrived in the province in 1732, and John Penn came over in 1734. Soon after the arrival of the latter news was brought that Lord Baltimore had made application to have the provinces transferred to his colony, and John Penn returned to England to defend the proprietary rights. In August, 1736, Governor Gordon died. His term had been one of prosperity, and the colony had grown rapidly in numbers and in the industries. James Logan, president of the council, was, in effect, governor during the two years following the death of Gordon. During this period serious trouble broke out near the Maryland border, west of the Susquehanna, in which several skirmishes took place between parties of Marylanders and Pennsylvanians, resulting in the death of some of the participants. Learning of these troubles, the king in Council issued an order restraining both parties from further acts of violence, and afterwards adopted a plan of settlement of the vexed boundary question.