History of Coshocton County, Ohio

This work is presented to the reader with a due sense of its shortcomings, but a hope that it may not utterly fail of its mission to please, and satisfy whatever desire may have been created for a complete history of Coshocton county. The work has been accomplished with much difficulty and labor, but we are not unaware of the criticism that may be in store for it, largely due to the fact that almost every reader is personally cognizant of the facts it contains. The student of general history grants the truth of its settlements without question, for the reason that he personally knows nothing of the events themselves; had he this knowledge, he would quickly see the imperfections of the work, and at once understand that the production of a county history, if the work be conscientiously done, is a most difficult and thankless undertaking.

The publisher and compiler have labored faithfully to produce a true history, and feel under obligations to the people of the county for the generous patronage extended, and especially so to Messrs. James R. Johnson, Colonel E.L. Pocock, T.C. Ricketts and Dr. S.H. Lee, of Coshocton; James Le Retilley, of Roscoe; Colonel Pren Metham, of Jefferson township; J.C. McBane, of Franklin township; Joseph Love, James Magness, Thomas Piatt and Joseph Heslip, of Linton township, and others who freely and generously gave their aid, information and influence in the prosecution of the work. To the county officials, Messrs. John Crawford, recorder, John W. Cassingham, auditor, Israel Dillon, clerk, John Beaver, treasurer, and William Walker, deputy treasurer, our grateful acknowledgements are also due for courtesies extended. Among the many publications and other printed material used in the compilation, we are indebted to "Historical Collections of Coshocton County," by William E. Hunt (a very valuable aid); "Howe's Historical Collections of Ohio:" "Historical Sketches of Coshocton and Vicinity," published in 1850, by Rev. H. Calhoun;" The Practical Preacher," a Coshocton publication, as well as "Reid's Ohio in the War," and others. The war history was gathered largely from the old files of Coshocton papers, and from the lips of the surviving veterans, to many of whom the manuscript was submitted prior to publication, and by them pronounced correct.

A. A. Graham's history of Ohio occupies the opening chapters, as it seems necessary to a complete county history, so closely are the interests and history of State and county connected. The early history of the county was largely the work of Hon. Isaac Smucker, of Newark, who has spent the greater portion of his long life in historical research, and is especially well versed in the early history of Ohio. The chapters on the townships and the town of Coshocton are due to the faithful labors of John B. Mansfield, a careful writer, and now a promising attorney, who personally visited every portion of the county and conversed with the citizens, thus gathering from the pioneers facts of importance not otherwise attainable. He was ably seconded by Mr. Frank J. Longdon, to whose faithful work and general supervision much of the success of the enterprise is due.

The field of labor has been one prolific of great events, especially in the years immediately preceding the white settlement. The valleys of the Muskingum and its tributaries teemed with human life in pre-historic times, as the numerous mounds and earth-works clearly attest; and, later, a great host of Red Men were here; and, at the confluence of these beautiful streams, whose musical names will forever perpetuate their memory, stood the capital city of one of the most intelligent of these tribes of the forest.

 

Table of Contents

CHAPTER I. Introduction, Topography, Geology, Primitive Races, Antiquities, Indian Tribes... 11

CHAPTER II. Explorations in the West... 19

CH.VPTER III. English Explorations, Traders, French and Indian War in the West, English Possessions... 37

CHAPTER IV. Pontiac's Conspiracy, Its Failure, Bouquet's Expedition, Occupation by the English... 48

CHAPTER V. American Exploration, Dunmore's War, Campaign of George Rogers Clark, Land Troubles, Spain in the Revolution, Murder of the Morovian Indians... 52

CHAPTER VI. American Occupation, Indian Claims, Early Land Companies, Compact of 1787, Organization of the Territory, Early American Settlements in the Ohio Valley. First Territorial Officers, Organization of Counties... 60

CHAPTER VII. Indian War of 1795, Harmar's Campaign, St. Clair's Campaign, Wayne's Campaign, Close of the War... 73

CHAPTER VIII. Jay's Treaty, The Question of State Rights and National Supremacy, Extension of Ohio Settlements, Land Claims, Spanish Boundary Question... 79

CHAPTER IX. First Territorial Representatives in Congress, Division of the Territory, Formation of States, Marietta Settlement. Other Settlements, Settlements of the Western Reserve, Settlement of the Central Valleys, Further Settlements in the Reserve and elsewhere... 85

CHAPTER X. Formation of the State Government, Ohio a State, The State Capitals, Legislation, The "Sweeping" Resolutions... 121

CHAPTER XI. The War of 1812, Growth of the State, Canal, Railroads and Other Improvements, Development of State Resources... 127

CHAPTER XII. Mexican War, Continued Growth of the State, War of the Rebellion, Ohio's Part in the Conflict... 132

CHAPTER XIII. Ohio in the Centennial, Address of Edward D. Mansfield, LL. D., Philadelphia, August 9, 187G... 138

CHAPTER XIV. Education, Early School Laws, Notes, Institutions and Educational Journals, School System, School Funds, Colleges and Universities... 148

CHAPTER XV. Agriculture, Area of the State, Early Agriculture in the West, Markets, Live Stock, Nurseries, Fruits, Etc.; Cereals, Roots and Cucurbitaceous Crops, Agricultural Implements, Agricultural Societies, Pomological and Horticultural Societies.... 151

CHAPTER XVI. Climatology, Outline, Variations in Ohio, Estimate in Degrees, Amount of Variability.... 163

CHAPTER XVII. TOPOGRAPHY AND GEOLOGY... 165

CHAPTER XVIII. ARCHEOLOGY... 180

CHAPTER XIX. INDIANS.... 193

CHAPTER XX. BOUQUET'S EXPEDITION... 205

CHAPTER XXI. COLONEL BRODHEAD'S EXPEDITION.... 213

CHAPTER XXII. WETZEL AND BRADY... 217

CHAPTER XXIII. MORAVIAN MISSIONS... 228

CHAPTER XXIV. FIRST WHITE OCCUPATION... 236

CHAPTER XXV. SCRAPS OF HISTORY... 254

CHAPTER XXVI. JOHN CHAPMAN... 264

CHAPTER XXVII. PIONEER TIMES... 267

CHAPTER XXVIII. THE CANAIS... 283

CHAPTER XXIX. RAILROADS... 288

CHAPTER XXX. - AGRICULTURE... 290

CHAPTER XXXI. COUNTY BUILDINGS AND OFFICERS... 297

CHAPTER XXXII. - BENCH AND BAR... 306

CHAPTER XXXIII. WAR OF 1812... 310

CHAPTER XXXIV. WAR WITH MEXICO... 314 CHAPTER XXXV. WAR OF THE REBELLION... 321

CHAPTER XXXVI. - WAR OF THE REBELLION, CONTINUED... 326

CHAPTER XXXVII. WAR OF THE REBELLION, CONTINUED... 337

CHAPTER XXXVIII. WAR OF THE REBELLION, CONTINUED... 345

CHAPTER XXXIX. WAR OF THE REBELLION, CONTINUED... 356

CHAPTER XL. WAR OF THE REBELLION, CONTINUED... 362

CHAPTER XLI. WAR OF THE REBELLION, CONTINUED... 368

CHAPTER XLII. WAR OF THE REBELLION, CONTINUED... 379

CHAPTER XLIII. WAR OF THE REBELLION, CONTINUED... 390

CHAPTER XLIV. WAR OF THE REBELLION, CONCLUDED... 396

CHAPTER XLV. EARLY HISTORY OF COSHOCTON... 411

CHAPTER XLVI. GROWTH OF COSHOCTON - PRESS - FRATERNITIES... 421

CHAPTER XLVII. MERCANTILE AND OTHER INDUSTRIAL INTERESTS... 429

CHAPTER XLVIII. SCHOOLS AND CHURCHES OF COSHOCTON.... 538

TOWNSHIP HISTORY.

CHAPTER XLIX. ADAMS TOWNSHIP... 453

CHAPTER L. BEDFORD TOWNSHIP... 461

CHAPTER LI. BETHLEHEM TOWNSHIP... 470

CHAPTER LII. CLARK TOWNSHIP... 476

CHAPTER LIII. CRAWFORD TOWNSHIP... 486

CHAPTER LIV. FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP... 491

CHAPTER LV. JACKSON TOWNSHIP... 500

CHAPTER LVI. JEFFERSON TOWNSHIP... 510

CHAPTER LVII. - KEENE TOWNSHIP... 523

CHAPTER LVIII. LAFAYETTE TOWNSHIP... 531

CHAPTER LIX. - LINTON TOWNSHIP... 540

CHAPTER LX. MILL CREEK TOWNSHIP... 555

CHAPTER LXI. MONROE TOWNSHIP... 559

CHAPTER LXII. NEW CASTLE TOWNSHIP... 565

CHAPTER LXIII. OXFORD TOWNSHIP... 576

CHAPTER LXIV. PERRY TOWNSHIP... 580

CHAPTER LXV. PIKE TOWNSHIP... 586

CHAPTER LXVI. TIVERTON TOWNSHIP... 594

CHAPTER LXVII. TUSCARAWAS TOWNSHIP... 599

CHAPTER LXVIII. VIRGINIA TOWNSHIP... 610

CHAPTER LXIX. WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP... 614

CHAPTER LXX. WHITE EYES TOWNSHIP... 618

Biographical Sketches 627
Addenda 825
Errata 833

 

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The present State of Ohio, comprising an extent of country 210 miles north and south, 220 miles cast and west, in length and breadth 25,576,969 acres is a part of the Old Northwest Territory. This Territory embraced all of the present States of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin and so much of Minnesota as lies east of the Mississippi River. It became a corporate existence soon after the formation of the Virginia Colony, and when that colony took on the dignity of State government it became a county thereof, whose exact outline was unknown. The county embraced in its limits more territory than is comprised in all the New England and Middle States, and was the largest county ever known in the United States. It is watered by the finest system of rivers on the globe; while its inland seas are without a parallel. Its entire southern boundary is traversed by the beautiful Ohio, its western by the majestic Mississippi, and its northern and a part of its eastern are bounded by the fresh-water lakes, whose clear waters preserve an even temperature over its entire surface. Into these reservoirs of commerce flow innumerable streams of limpid water, which come from glen and dale, from mountain and valley, from forest and prairie all avenues of health, commerce and prosperity. Ohio is in the best part of this territory south of its river are tropical heats; north of Lake Erie are polar snows and a polar climate.