The history of Camden county, New Jersey

The evident want of a comprehensive history of Camden County and the encouragement given by many prominent citizens whose opinions were consulted in regard to that need, induced the publishers to undertake the task of preparing this volume. The promises made by the people of the county were generously fulfilled. After a year's diligent, faithful and well-directed effort, the book has been completed. It is now presented for the consideration and criticism of the intelligent reader, believing that it will meet his entire approval. Every effort has been made to prepare a work acceptable to its patrons, creditable alike to its author and the publishers, and worthy of the dignified name of history.

Great credit is due the Hon. John Clement, of Haddonfield, whose efficient aid and wise counsel were of inestimable value during the whole period of the preparation. His interest in local history was inspired by his intelligent father, and being a lineal descendant of one of the first settlers of West Jersey, he was naturally impelled to continue his investigations. The knowledge which he possesses in this field, was acquired after long and diligent research among original records and innumerable authorities.

Among the publishers' corps of writers were Edington P. Fulton, now on the editorial staff of the Philadelphia Times, Alfred Mathews, Austin N. Hungerford, J.L. Rockey, Edgar O. Wagner, Captain Frank H. Coles and Frank J. Richards. Dr. John R. Stevenson, of Haddonfield, prepared the chapter on medicine. Rev. F.R. Brace, the chapter on education and Hon. Edward Burrough the history of Delaware township. Benjamin M. Braker contributed material for the chapters upon Camden and Gloucester cities. Acknowledgements are due Peter L. Voorhees, Esq., for valuable suggestions, S.H. Grey, Esq., and Colonel S.C. Harbert, for the use of files of early newspapers, to John W. Wright, Colonel Robert B. Hull, Isaac C. Martindale and Howard M. Cooper, Esq., and to the members of the press and the clergy of the county.

In concluding these few lines a word concerning the department of illustrations, which supplements the literary contents of the volume, is not out of place. The illustrations consist largely of portraits of some of those men who have been, or are, prominent residents of the territory to which this volume is devoted. These portraits, with the accompanying biographical sketches, form a feature which is sometimes the subject of ill-considered criticism, on the ground that they are of persons living. Nevertheless, in the judgment of the publishers, and of a great many persons who have given the matter careful consideration, the department is one which should neither be omitted nor limited by the insertion of the portraits and sketches of those only who are deceased. When it is borne in mind how swiftly the stream of life and time sweeps on how quickly the present glides into the past there will be few to find fault with this department ; and when a score or more of years have elapsed when the generations now marching in the front, and in the closely succeeding ranks, shall have passed away, this feature will be invaluable, serving as the best reminder of some of their most conspicuous and honored characters, to those who remain.

 

Table of Contents

CHAPTER I.
Topography and Botany 1-4

CHAPTER II.
The Indians 4-16

CHAPTER III.
Early Colonial History 17-24

CHAPTER IV.
The Friends in West Jersey 24-30

CHAPTER V.
Early History of Old Gloucester 30-38

CHAPTER VI.
The French and Indian War 35-36

CHAPTER VII.
The War of the Revolution 36-77

CHAPTER VIII.
The War of 1812-14 77-86

CHAPTER IX.
The War with Mexico 86-89

CHAPTER X.
The War for the Union 89-179

CHAPTER XI.
The Erection of Camden County 179-186

CHAPTER XII.
Civil List 186-196

CHAPTER XIII.
The Bench and Bar of Camden County 196-237

CHAPTER XIV.
A History of Medicine and Medical Men 237-308

CHAPTER XV.
Education 308-319

CHAPTER XVI.
The Press 319-330

CHAPTER XVII.
Authors and Scientists 330-339

CHAPTER XVIII.
Public Internal Improvements 340-369

CHAPTER XIX.
Navigation and Ship-Building 360-385

CHAPTER XX.
Agriculture 385-396

CHAPTER XXI.
Old Grave-Yards 395-400

CITIES, BOROUGHS AND TOWNSHIPS.

CHAPTER I.
THE CITY OF CAMDEN 403-424

CHAPTER II.
MUNICIPAL HISTORY 425-444

CHAPTER III.
EARLY BUSINESS INTERESTS OF CAMDEN 444-454

CHAPTER IV.
BANKS AND BANKING 454-467

CHAPTER V.
RELIGIOUS HISTORY OF CAMDEN 467-497

CHAPTER VI.
THE SCHOOLS 497-507

CHAPTER VII.
THE MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES 507-538

CHAPTER VIII.
MISCELLANEOUS MATTERS 538-558

CHAPTER IX.
SECRET AND BENEVOLENT SOCIETIES 558-581

CHAPTER X.
GLOUCESTER CITY 582-607

CHAPTER XI.
THE BOROUGH OF HADDONFIELD 608-635

CHAPTER XII.
THE TOWNSHIP OF HADDON 636-654

CHAPTER XIII.
THE TOWNSHIP OF WATERFORD 655-671

CHAPTER XIV.
THE TOWNSHIP OF GLOUCESTER 672-693

CHAPTER XV.
THE TOWNSHIP OF WINSLOW 694-703

CHAPTER XVI.
THE TOWNSHIP OF CENTRE 704-712

CHAPTER XVII.
THE TOWNSHIP OF DELAWARE 713-738

CHAPTER XVIII.
THE TOWNSHIP OF STOCKTON 739-763

 

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Camden County has a front on the Delaware River of ten miles, and extends south- easterly about thirty miles to the line of Atlantic County. Timber Creek, from the river, bounds it on the southwest to the head of the south branch of that stream, and by a short land line to the head of Four-Mile Branch, and down the whole length of that stream to Great Egg Harbor River and thence down that river to the Atlantic County line. On the northeast Pensaukin Creek from the river bounds the county to the source of the south branch, and by a line across the country to near the head of Mullica River, or a branch thereof, known as Atco Atco, and thence down the stream to where Atlantic County makes a corner near Atsion.