The history of Nodaway county, Missouri

What wonderful changes a few years have wrought in Northwest Missouri! Less than forty-five years ago not a single white man dwelt within the present limits of Nodaway County. Its soil had, doubtless, occasionally been pressed by the feet of the reckless hunter and daring adventurer, but its beautiful rolling prairies, its charming timber-fringed streams and enchanting groves, were the homes of the antelope, the elk, the buffalo and the red man. How all has been changed by the hand of progress! To-day the busy hum of industry everywhere resounds* and the voice of culture and refinement echo where once was heard the howl of the wild beast and the war-whoop of the Indian. These have been years fraught with important events to the sons and daughters from the old firesides of Kentucky, Virginia, Tennessee, Ohio and Indiana, and from the more distant homes beyond the Atlantic. The energy and bravery of these hardy pioneers, and their descendants, have made Nodaway County what it is. Their labors have made the wilderness "to bud and blossom as the rose," and, to preserve the story of this wonderful change, and to hand it down to posterity as a link in the history of the great state of which Nodaway County forms an integral part, has been the object of this book.

 

Table of Contents

HISTORY OF MISSOURI.

CHAPTER I.
LOUISIANA PURCHASE 9

CHAPTER II.
DESCRIPTIVE AND GEOGRAPHICAL 14

CHAPTER III.
GEOLOGY OF MISSOURI 20

CHAPTER IV.
TITLE AND EARLY SETTLEMENTS 26

CHAPTER V.
TERRITORIAL ORGANIZATION 32

CHAPTER VI.
MISSOURI ADMITTED INTO THE UNION 55

CHAPTER VII.
MISSOURI AS A STATE 40

CHAPTER VIII.
EARLY MILITARY RECORD 46

CHAPTER IX.
CIVIL WAR IN MISSOURI 51

CHAPTER X.
AGRICULTURE AND MATERIAL WEALTH 60

CHAPTER XI.
EDUCATION 66

CHAPTER XII.
RELIGIOUS DENOMINATIONS 73
HISTORY OF NODAWAY COUNTY.
CHAPTER I.
FREFATORY 79

CHAPTER II.
PLATTE PURCHASE 86

CHAPTER III.
PHYSICAL FEATURES 54

CHAPTER IV.
GEOLOGY OF NODAWAY COUNTY 101

CHAPTER V.
FIRST SETTLEMENTS 113

CHAPTER VI.
PIONEER LIFE 119

CHAPTER VII.
NODAWAY COUNTY ORGANIZED 130

CHAPTER VIII.
COUNTY AND TOWNSHIP SYSTEM GOVERNMENT SURVEY'S - ORGANIZATION OF TOWNSHIPS 142

CHAPTER IX.
ATCHISON TOWNSHIP 150

CHAPTER X.
GRANT TOWNSHIP 159

CHAPTER XI.
GREEN TOWNSHIP 166

CHAPTER XII.
HOPKINS TOWNSHIP 174

CHAPTER XIII.
HUGHES TOWNSHIP 191

CHAPTER XIV.
INDEPENDENCE TOWNSHIP 209

CHAPTER XV.
JACKSON TOWNSHIP 217

CHAPTER XVI.
JEFFERSON TOWNSHIP 224

CHAPTER XVII.
LINCOLN TOWNSHIP 232

CHAPTER XVIII.
MONROE TOWNSHIP 243

CHAPTER XIX.
NODAWAY TOWNSHIP 249

CHAPTER XX.
POLK TOWNSHIP 259

CHAPTER XXI.
UNION TOWNSHIP 309

CHAPTER XXII.
WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP 315

CHAPTER XXIII.
WHITE CLOUD TOWNSHIP 322

CHAPTER XXIV.
PUBLIC BUILDINGS 329

CHAPTER XXV.
CALIFORNIA GOLD EXCITEMENT 339

CHAPTER XXVI.
CHRONICLES OF THE WEST 347

CHAPTER XXVII.
BENCH AND BAR 360

CHAPTER XXVIII.
CRIMES TRIALS 430

CHAPTER XXIX.
Centennial Address, by Dr. H. E. Robinson Old Settlers to whom Prizes were presented at Burlington Junction, 1880 Presentation of Prizes at Fair of 1881 Hon. Lafe Dawson's Address 430

CHAPTER XXX.
AGRICULTURAL INTERESTS 443

CHAPTER XXXI.
RAILROADS 464

CHAPTER XXXII.
PUBLIC SCHOOLS. EARLY CHURCHES AND MINISTERS 471

CHAPTER XXXIII.
FINANCIAL AND POLITICAL HISTORY OF NODAWAY COUNTY 482

CHAPTER XXXIV.
TORNADOES 502
BIOGRAPHICAL.

LITHOGRAPHIC PORTRAITS

 

Read this Book - Free

Download the Book - Free ( 67.9 MB PDF )

More than forty years have passed, since the first white settlement was made within the bounds of that territory now known as Nodaway County, Missouri.

Nearly a half a century since, the uncivilized aborigines roamed the prairies wild and free, unfettered by the restraints of common or statutory law, and uncircumscribed by township boundaries and county lines. The transformation which has taken place in the physiognomy of the country alone, is beyond the comprehension of the finite mind; luxuriant groves, where there was the wide stretching prairie; cultivated fields where was the primeval forest; orchards, vineyards, and gardens where waved the tall prairie grass. So marked has been the change in the physiognomy of the country that there has been a decided change in the climatology. The elements themselves seem to have taken notice of the great change, and have governed themselves accordingly. While the annual rainfall and the mean annual temperature remain the same in quantity, they are entirely different in quality, and although imperceptible and independent of man's will, they have, nevertheless, come under the same civilizing power which has changed the wilderness into a fruitful land.