History of Clay County, Missouri

This history of Clay County has been compiled from three sources, printed and oral, which were deemed authentic and reliable, and from personal observation. No apocryphal event has been recorded, nor questionable story attempted to be preserved. Gleanings from unquestioned truthful printed history have been freely made. The public archives in Washington City have been in requisition, and from the writings of Mr. Jefferson more than excerpts have been taken therefrom.

The Editor has been a resident of Clay County for more than half a century which is more than half of the time since the County has had an existence, and has had not only the acquaintanceship, but in many instances the friendship of a number of the original settlers. Not a few of these men had vivid recollections of events occurring in the County from the very earliest days down to the time when they took delight in giving information to the writer, who was invariably a receptive listener. To him no entertainment was preferable than to have the privilege of listening to such men as John Wilson, "Marse" Fountain Waller, John Bronaugh, James, Alvin and Foster Means nan-ate true incidents, stories of the early days in Clay County. James Means lived continuously on the same farm from infancy to very old age, yet he lived during that time in three different counties Howard, Ray and Clay.

Had not the Editor a predisposition to observe and retain historical facts, he certainly must have in the course of fifty years absorbed, at least, a modicum of historical events.

 

Table of Contents

CHAPTER I.
LOUISIANA PURCHASE 65-72

CHAPTER II.
ORGANIZATION OF COUNTY 73-84

CHAPTER III.
EARLY COURTS AND ELECTIONS 85-97

CHAPTER IV.
INDIAN TROUBLES 98-103

CHAPTER V.
MEXICAN WAR 104-112

CHAPTER VI.
EVENTS PRIOR TO THE CIVIL WAR 113-122

CHAPTER VII.
CIVIL WAR PERIOD 123-137

CHAPTER VIII.
AFTER THE CIVIL WAR 138-147

CHAPTER IX.
LIBERTY TOWNSHIP 148-150

CHAPTER X.
LIBERTY 151-167

CHAPTER XI.
FISHING RIVER TOWNSHIP 167-172

CHAPTER XII.
EXCELSIOR SPRINGS 173-188

CHAPTER XIII.
GALLATIN TOWNSHIP 189-192

CHAPTER XIV.
PLATTE TOWNSHIP 193-200

CHAPTER XV.
KEARNEY TOWNSHIP 201-207

CHAPTER XVI.
WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP 208-210

CHAPTER XVII.
WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE 211-224

CHAPTER XVIII.
ORGANIZED MEDICINE IN CLAY COUNTY 223-230

CHAPTER XIX.
ROAD BUILDING 231-236

CHAPTER XX.
DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION.
ALEXANDER DONIPHAN CHAPTER 237-242

CHAPTER XXI.
THE PRESS 243-244

CHAPTER XXII.
THE MORMONS 245-248

CHAPTER XXIII.
THE JAMES BOYS 249-254

CHAPTER XXIV.
THE WORLD WAR 255-275

CHAPTER XXV.
THE CLAY COUNTY COUNCIL OF DEFENSE 276-278

CHAPTER XXVI.
CLAY COUNTY WOMAN'S COMMITTEE COUNCIL OF NATIONAL DEFENSE 279-291

CHAPTER XXVII.
CLAY COUNTY CHAPTER, AMERICAN RED CROSS 292-309

CHAPTER XXVIII.
SOME CLAY COUNTY AND MISSOURI EVENTS 310-327

CHAPTER XXIX.
OFFICIALS FROM THE ORGANIZATION OF CLAY COUNTY 328-337

 

Read the Book - Free

Download the Book - Free ( 32.3 MB PDF)

Clay County was formed from Ray, January 2, 1822, extending from the Missouri River north to the Iowa line, with its present width of about twenty-one miles, and its length, of about one hundred miles.

The Act of the Legislature creating the County, appointed five com- missioners to select a permanent seat of government for the county, and further provided that until the selection of this permanent seat was made, all courts should be held at the house of John Owens, which house was located upon what is now known on the plat of the town now city of Liberty, as lot 173, on Water street. The commissioners named in the Act were Henry Estes, Enos Vaughn, Wyatt Adkins and John Pouge.