The history of Des Moines County, Iowa

In the preparation of a work of this character, the writer labors under peculiar embarrassments, which arise from the fact that the lapse of time has not mellowed harsh colors and softened bold lines in the panorama of events. While the newness of the region herein described enables us to secure many valuable bits of history which would be lost in the current of time, the presence of the chief participators in the occurrences which constitute the history of this county, acts as a constant check to a free presentment of incidents and a full expression of opinions.

Many things have been left unsaid which might have been inserted here, and for no other reason than that the writer felt the delicacy of his position. When men are dead, volumes can be written concerning them and with impunity; for then the writer cannot be accused of mercenary motives, nor can the subject of eulogy be calumniated by jealous minds. We have refrained from saying that which may truthfully be said of the distinguished men of this county, because we feel that the time for such words has not yet come. We have endeavored to condense in the form of one volume the scattered fragments of fact which have floated about so long. Some will say the work is well performed, while others will condemn it. The future generations, however, will surely say that this work is a valuable one.

 

Table of Contents

HISTORY NORTHWEST AND STATE OF IOWA.
ABSTRACT OF IOWA STATE LAWS.
ILLUSTRATIONS.
BIOGRAPHICAL TOWNSHIP DIRECTORY.
LITHOGRAPHIC PORTRAITS.
HISTORY OF DES MOINES COUNTY.
DES MOINES COUNTY VOLUNTEERS.
MISCELLANEOUS.

 

Read the Book - Free

Download the Book - Free ( 44.8 MB PDF)

Pontiac's immediate field of action was the garrison at Detroit. Here, however, the plans were frustrated by an Indian woman disclosing the plot the evening previous to his arrival. Everything was carried out, however, according to Pontiac's plans until the moment of action, when Major Gladwyn, the commander of the post, stepping to one of the Indian chiefs, suddenly drew aside his blanket and disclosed the concealed musket. Pontiac, though a brave man, turned pale and trembled. He saw his plan was known, and that the garrison were prepared. He endeavored to exculpate himself from any such intentions; but the guilt was evident, and he and his followers were dismissed with a severe reprimand, and warned never to again enter the walls of the post.