History of Litchfield County, Connecticut

The province of the historian is to gather the threads of the past ere they elude forever his grasp, and weave them into a harmonious web, to which the " art preservative" may give immortality; therefore he who would rescue from oblivion the deeds of a community, and send them on to futurity in an imperishable record, should deliver " a plain, unvarnished tale,"

"Nothing extenuate, Nor aught set down in malice."

In such a spirit have the compilers of the following pages approached the work of detailing the history of the county embodied herein, and trust they have been fairly faithful to the task imposed.

It has been our honest endeavor to trace the history of the development of this section from that period when it was in the undisputed possession of the red men to the present, and to place before the reader an authentic narrative of its rise and progress to the prominent position it now occupies among the counties of New England.

That such an undertaking is attended with no little difficulty and vexation none will deny; the aged pioneer relates events of the early settlements, while his neighbor sketches the same events with totally different outlines. Man's memory is ever at fault, while Time paints a different picture upon every mind. With these the historian has to contend; and while it has been our aim to compile an accurate history, were it devoid of all inaccuracies that perfection would have been attained of which the writers had not the faintest conception, and which Lord Macaulay once said never could be reached.

From colonial and other documents in the State archives, from county, town, and village records, family manuscripts, printed publications, and innumerable private sources of information, we have endeavored to produce a history which should prove accurate, instructive, and in every respect worthy of the county represented. How well we have succeeded in our task a generous public, jealous of its reputation and honor, of its traditions and triumphs, must now be the judge.

We desire to acknowledge our sincere thanks to the editorial fraternity generally for much valuable information, which has greatly lessened our labor in the preparation of this work, and also to each and every one who has assisted in its compilation, and would cheerfully make personal mention of each, but it is impracticable, as the number reaches over a thousand.

 

Table of Contents

CHAPTER I.
Geographical and Descriptive 13

CHAPTER II.
Bench and Bae 14

CHAPTER III.
Medical History 48

CHAPTER IV.
Military History 60

CHAPTER V.
Military History (Continued) 63

CHAPTER VI.
Military History (Continued) 98

CHAPTER VII.
Internal Improvements 100

CHAPTER VIII.
Population and School Statistics 104

CHAPTER IX.
Litchfield 105

CHAPTER X.
Litchfield (Continued) 110

CHAPTER XI.
Litchfield (Continued) 120

CHAPTER XII.
Litchfield (Continued) 129

CHAPTER XIII
Litchfield (Continued) 137

CHAPTER XIV.
Litchfield (Continued) 152

CHAPTER XV.
Winchester 167

CHAPTER XVI.
Winchester (Continued) 186

CHAPTER XVII.
Winchester (Continued) 198

CHAPTER XVIII.
Winchester (Continued) 206

CHAPTER XIX.
Winchester (Continued) 216

CHAPTER XX.
Barkhamsted 237

CHAPTER XXI.
Barkhamsted (Continued) 239

CHAPTER XXII.
Barkhamsted (Continued) 243

CHAPTER XXIII.
Barkhamsted (Continued) 246

CHAPTER XXIV.
Barkhamsted (Continued) 249

CHAPTER XXV.
Bethlehem 251

CHAPTER XXVI.
Bridgewater 265

CHAPTER XXVII.
Canaan 264

CHAPTER XXVIII.
Canaan (Continued) 267

CHAPTER XXIX.
Colebrook 274

CHAPTER XXX.
Cornwall 287

CHAPTER XXXI.
Cornwall (Continued) 300

CHAPTER XXXII.
Goshen 22

CHAPTER XXXIII.
Goshen (Continued) 333

CHAPTER XXXIV.
Goshen (Continued). Ecclesiastical, Civil, and Military 346

CHAPTER XXXV.
Harwinton 374

CHAPTER XXXVI.
Harwinton (Continued) 379

CHAPTER XXXVII.
Kent 384

CHAPTER XXXVIII.
Morris 388

CHAPTER XXXIX.
New Hartford 393

CHAPTER XL.
New Milford 422

CHAPTER XLI.
New Milford (Continued) 426

CHAPTER XLII.
New Milford (Continued) 438

CHAPTER XLIII.
New Milford (Continued) 445

CHAPTER XLTV.
New Milford (Continued) 451

CHAPTER XLV.
New Milford (Continued) 455

CHAPTER XLVI.
Norfolk 468

CHAPTER XLVII.
North Canaan 482

CHAPTER XLVIII.
Plymouth 486

CHAPTER XLIX.
Plymouth (Continued) 492

CHAPTER L.
Plymouth (Continued) 500

CHAPTER LI.
Roxbury 512

CHAPTER LII.
Salisbury 518

CHAPTER LIII.
Salisbury (Continued) 533

CHAPTER LIV.
Salisbury (Continued) 541

CHAPTER LV.
Salisbury (Continued). Civil And Military 547

CHAPTER LVI.
Sharon 563

CHAPTER LVII.
Sharon (Continued) 583

CHAPTER LVIII.
Thomaston 599

CHAPTER LIX.
Torrington 610

CHAPTER LX.
Torrington (Continued) 620

CHAPTER LXI.
Torrington (Continued) 626

CHAPTER LXII.
Torrington (Continued) 634

CHAPTER LXIII.
Torrington (Continued) 637

CHAPTER LXIV.
Warren 641

CHAPTER LXV.
Washington 651

CHAPTER LXVI.
Watertown 660

CHAPTER LXVII.
Watertown (Continued) 670

CHAPTER LXVIII.
Watertown (Continued) 672

CHAPTER LXIX.
Woodbury 685

CHAPTER LXX.
Woodbury (Continued) 687

CHAPTER LXXI.
Woodbury (Continued) 691

CHAPTER LXXII.
Woodbury (Continued) 693

CHAPTER LXXIII.
Woodbury (Continued) 695

CHAPTER LXXIV.
Woodbury (Continued) 697

CHAPTER LXXV.
WoODBUKY (Continued) 700

CHAPTER LXXV I.
Woodbury (Continued) 705
Supplement 723

 

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Litchfield County lies in the extreme northwestern portion of the State of Connecticut, and is bounded as follows: On the north by Massachusetts, on the east by Hartford and New Haven Counties, on the south by New Haven and Fairfield Counties, and on the west by the counties of Dutchess and Columbia, in New York. It comprises about eight hundred and eighty-five square miles of territory, and is the largest county in area in the State.