A New and Complete History of the County of York, England

VOLUME I

The history of a county so extensive, and presenting such a succession of interesting objects, might indeed have been of a much more voluminous character. The transition of property, the history of the endowments of the early religious houses, and of the present churches, and minute details of the rise and progress of the manufactures almost indigenous to Yorkshire, would necessarily occupy many folio volumes. This work, however, does not interfere with any design for a history of this great province, taking the interesting but laborious study of the descent of property as its basis. Such a task, I am afraid, could be executed but by few individuals; how very few are found who possess the animus and the natural instinct, as Mr. Hunter terms it, necessary to undertake such a work, and proceed without disorder to its termination. A period of thirty or forty years must be devoted to such a task, with ample leisure for the needful researches, and for reflection upon the result of those researches. Let me hope that until such a work has been produced, this History and Survey may be considered as occupying an important place, if not the first, among the annals of the county.

The arrangement of this Work, as far as relates to the townships and their localities, has been made on the basis of the official returns of the population taken in 1821. I cannot, on this subject, help expressing my regret, that such a work as the Census, which ought to be taken as the standard for the orthography and the locale of every place in England, is, as regards this county, and some others that I am acquainted with, grossly inaccurate: many townships are termed parishes, and considerable confusion exists in the apportioning the different minute portions into which Yorkshire has been divided from the earliest period.

The difficulty of depending on local information is frequently very unpleasant to the historian. I have received in some parts of England not less than half a dozen different versions of one matter of fact, as to who was the possessor of a mansion or estate only ten years before the inquiry was made. It is a matter of considerable gratification to myself, and it cannot be less so to my readers, to feel assured that such an occurrence never took place in any part of Yorkshire. The information I sought was granted with promptitude, with kindness, and generally with correctness. I can hardly call to mind ever having been led astray, and I am confident never wilfully so.

 

Table of Contents

BOOK I. General History.

CHAP. I.
Situation, Extent, Etymology, and General History, from the Earliest Period to the Commencement of the Saxon Heptarchy 1

CHAP. II.
General History continued, from the Commencement of the Saxon Heptarchy to the Accession of William 16

CHAP. III.
General History continued, from the Commencement of the Reign of William the Conqueror to the Union of the Houses of York and Lancaster 33

CHAP. IV.
History of the County, from the Union of the Houses of York and Lancaster to the Accession of Charles the First 63

CHAP. V.
General History continued, from the Accession of Charles the First to the Restoration 79

CHAP. VI.
General History continued, from the Restoration of Charles the Second to the Coronation of George the Fourth 109

BOOK II. Statistical History.

CHAP. I.
Situation, Extent, Boundaries and Soil of the Ridings of the County 131

CHAP. II.
Agriculture 136

CHAP. III.
Climate and General Appearance 151

CHAP. IV.
Mineralogy, Geology, Rivers, &c 160

CHAP. V.
Manufactures and Commerce 171

CHAP. VI.
Ecclesiastical and Civil Government, Honorial History, Population. Ancient and Present Division of the County 204

 

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VOLUME II

 

Table of Contents

BOOK III. - Topographical Survey of the City and Ainstey of York

CHAP. I.
Situation, Etymology, History of York from the Earliest Period, and Civil Government 1

CHAP. II.
Roman Antiquities discovered in York 18

CHAP. III.
Walls, Gates and Posterns of York 34

CHAP. IV.
Historical Notices of the Foundation and Successive Alterations of the Cathedral 48

CHAP. V.
Biographical Notices of the Archbishops of York 72

CHAP. VI.
Survey of the Cathedral 81

CHAP. VII.
Monuments and Tombs in the Cathedral 118

CHAP. VIII.
Survey of the Close of the Cathedral and its Appendages 140

CHAP. IX.
Survey of Micklegate Ward 157

CHAP. X.
Survey of Walmgate Ward 184

CHAP. XI.
Survey of Monk Ward 240

CHAP. XII.
Survey of Bootham Ward 276

CHAP. XIII.
liberties of York 312

CHAP. XIV.
St. Mary's Abbey and the King's Manor, York 356

CHAP. XV.
The Ainstey of York 388

 

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VOLUME IV

 

Table of Contents

BOOK IV. History and Topographical Survey of the East Riding continued.

CHAP. XII.
Survey of Dickering Wapentake 1

CHAP. XIII.
Survey of Buckrose Wapentake 97

CHAP. XIV.
Survey of Ouse and Derwent Wapentake 125

CHAP. XV.
Survey of Howdenshire 146

CHAP. XVI.
Historic Notices of the Lords of Holderness, and of the Ancient State of that District 184

CHAP. XVII.
Survey of the North Division of the Wapentake of Holderness 218

CHAP. XVIII.
Survey of Holderness Wapentake (middle division) 237

CHAP. XIX.
Survey of Holderness Wapentake (south division) 285

Book V. History and Topographical Survey of the Parish and Borough of Leeds.

CHAP. I.
Ancient Rise and Progressive Increase of the Town, Manufactures Commerce, Municipal Government, &c 322

CHAP. II.
Survey of the Churches and Chapels, with some Account of the Public Charities in the Town of Leeds 362

CHAP. III.
General Survey of the Town of Leeds 415

CHAP. IV.
Survey of the Chapelries and Townships in the Parish of Leeds 447

 

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York, or Eboracum, is situated at the confluence of the rivers Ouse and Foss, near the centre of Great Britain, and in one of the most rich and extensive plains or vallies in England. It is nearly midway distant between London and Edinburgh, being one hundred and ninety-eight miles from the former, and two hundred and one from the latter.